Chinese Birds
Chinese Birds 2010, 1(1) 70-73 DOI:   10.5122/cbirds.2009.0001  ISSN: 1674-7674 CN: 11-5870/Q

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Keywords
Sociable Lapwing (Vanellus gregarius)
steppe
Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region
Alfred Edmund Brehm
Authors
Johannes Kamp
Maxim A. Koshkin
Robert D. Sheldon
PubMed
Article by Johannes Kamp
Article by Maxim A. Koshkin
Article by Robert D. Sheldon

Historic breeding of Sociable Lapwing (Vanellus gregarius) in Xinjiang

Johannes KAMP 1,*, Maxim A. KOSHKIN 2, Robert D. SHELDON 3

1 The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB), Conservation Science Department, The Lodge, Sandy, Bedfordshire SG19 2DL, UK
2 Association for the Conservation of Biodiversity in Kazakhstan, ul. Beibitshilik, 18, office 203, 01000
Astana, Kazakhstan
3 The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB), Scotland Headquarters, Dunedin House, 25
Ravelston Terrace, Edinburgh EH4 3TP, UK

Abstract

The Sociable Lapwing (Vanellus gregarius) was recently categorized as Critically Endangered by the IUCN due to a strong decline and overall range contraction. Until now the only published Chinese record of the species was a vagrant sighting in 1998. We reviewed reports and historic literature from a German ornithological expedition in 1876, which reported the species to be a breeding bird in Xinjiang, western China in the second half of the 19th century. According to local expertise, the species seems since to have become extinct in Xinjiang, but surveys are suggested to clarify its current status.

Keywords Sociable Lapwing (Vanellus gregarius)   steppe   Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region   Alfred Edmund Brehm  
Received  Revised  Online:  
DOI: 10.5122/cbirds.2009.0001

Fund: The Sociable Lapwing project is funded by the Darwin Initiative of the UK government and the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB), with additional support from Swarovski optics, The Rufford Foundation and Deutsche Ornithologen-Gesellschaft (DO-G).

Corresponding Authors: Johannes KAMP, The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB), Conservation Science Department, The Lodge, Sandy, Bedfordshire SG19 2DL, UK
Email: johannes.kamp@rspb.org.uk
About author:

References:
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